Showing 1–12 of 24 results

  • Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson – G.I. Gurdjieff

    With Beelzebub’s Tales to His GrandsonG. I. Gurdjieff intended to “destroy, mercilessly . . . the beliefs and views about everything existing in the world.” This novel beautifully brings to life the visions of humanity for which Gurdjieff has become esteemed. Beelzebub, a man of worldly (and other-worldly) wisdom, shares with his grandson the anecdotes, personal philosophies, and lessons learned from his own life.The reader is given a detailed discussion of all matters physical, natural, and spiritual, from the creation of the cosmos to man’s teleological purpose in the universe. This edition of Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson–the first single-volume paperback to appear in English–restores the original, authoritative translation.

  • Breath of the Absolute – Dialogues with Mooji

    “You wake up each day from the dream; but to be free, you must also wake up from the waking state.” – MoojiIn Breath of the Absolute, Mooji invites you to take a fresh look at yourself. Of all the subjects debated within the scope of human interest, the one undisputed fact is that we exist. What is not questioned is: As what do we exist? In this book, Mooji will push your mind beyond conceptual bickering into the pulsating clarity of the Unthinkable. “The words in this book, emanating from Silence, are an act of living grace. When Consciousness speaks, that which speaks and that which listens are One. There’s no seeker, no beloved. Only… Pure Awareness flowing as Love.” – Pamela Bloom, Author of The Power of Compassion“The two people in whom I have most experienced the presence of what we call the Divine are His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Mooji.”– Isabel Losada, Broadcaster and Internationally Bestselling Author of The Battersea Park Road to Enlightenment.

  • Come, Come, Yet Again Come – Osho

    Celebrating the Joy of Life Love and Meditation

    To summarize the compassionate outpouring of the enlightened mystic, whose published library of work includes over two hundred titles, is challenging at best. In this collection of responses to questions, Osho himself captures the entire message: “My whole teaching consists of two words, meditation and love.Here he introduces his vision of the new man who embodies the teaching – Zorba the Buddha. Into one identity, he brings together the lusty nature of Zorba the Greek and the silent stillness of the Buddha. The earthy Zorba and the ethereal Buddha are melded to become a silence which can sing and danceHe calls this new man the whole man: “The man is whole, the holy man,” and showers such acceptance and love on each and every person that this vision becomes an immediate possibility for all.The jokes are numerous and hilarious. How does a holy man get to be so wickedly funny? Come and hear the message: meditate, love – and laugh.

  • Emptiness Dancing

    There is something about you brighter than the sun and more mysterious than the night sky.

    Who are you when you are not thinking yourself into existence? What is ultimately behind the set of eyes reading these words? In Emptiness Dancing, Adyashanti invites you to wake up to the essence of what you are, through the natural and spontaneous opening of the mind, heart, and body that holds the secret to happiness and liberation.

  • Encounter the Enlightened: Conversations with the Master – Sadhguru

    In a milieu where life is seen as toil, Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev opens an entirely new possibility – to play with life whichever way you want, to live life intensely but go through it unscarred.

  • Freedom from the Known – Jiddu Krishnamurti

    Krishnamurti shows how people can free themselves radically and immediately from the tyranny of the expected, no matter what their age–opening the door to transforming society and their relationships.

  • Hua Hu Ching: The Unknown Teachings of Lao Tzu

    by Brian Walker

    The perfect companion to Stephen Mitchell’s version of the Tao Te Ching, this is the astonishing rendering of Lao Tzu’s further writings. Each of the eighty-one teachings presented by Taoist scholar and poet Brian Walker are rich with wisdom, mystery, and startling enlightenment.

  • I Am That by Nisargadatta Maharaj

    Back cover This collection of the timeless teachings of one of the greatest sages of India, Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, is a testament to the uniqueness of the seer’s life and work and is regarded by many as a modern spiritual classic. I Am That (first published in 1973) continues to draw new audiences and to enlighten seekers anxious for self-realization. Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj was a teacher who did not propound any ideology or religion, but gently unwrapped the mystery of the self. His message was simple, direct, and sublime. I Am That preserves his dialogs with the followers who came from around the world seeking guidance in destroying false identities. The sage’s sole concern was with the human suffering and the ending of suffering. It was his mission to guide the individual to an understanding of his true nature and the timelessness of being. He taught that the mind must recognize and penetrate its own state of being–not “being this or that, here or there, then or now,” but just timeless being. A simple man, Maharaj was a householder and petty storekeeper in Bombay where he lived and died in 1981 at the age of 84. He had not been educated formally but came to be respected and loved for his insights into the crux of human pain and for the extraordinary lucidity of his direct disclosure. Hundreds of diverse seekers traveled the globe and sought him out in his unpretentious home in Bombay (now Mumbai) to hear him. To all of them, he gave hope that “beyond the real experience is not the mind, but the self, the light in which everything appears … the awareness in which everything happens.” In the humble abode of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, but for the electric lights and the noises of the street traffic, one would not know in which period of human history one dwells. There is an atmosphere of timelessness about his tiny room; the subjects discussed are timeless — valid for all times; the way they are expounded and examined is also timeless; the centuries, millennia and yugas fall off and one deals with matters immensely ancient and eternally new. The discussions held and teachings given would have been the same ten thousand years ago and will be the same ten thousand years hence. There will always be conscious beings wondering about the fact of their being conscious and enquiring into its cause and aim. Whence am I? Who am I? Whither am I? Such questions have no beginning and no end. And it is crucial to know the answers, for without a full understanding of oneself, both in time and in timelessness, life is but a dream, imposed on us by powers we do not know, for purposes we cannot grasp. I Am That is a legacy from a unique teacher who helps the reader to a clearer understanding of himself as he comes to Maharaj with the age-old question, “Who am I?” Seekers were never turned away from the humble abode of Maharaj during his life and can still find their answers to this timeless question in the pages of this book today.

  • Moon In a Dewdrop: Writings of Zen Master Dogen

    Eihei Dogen (1200-1253), among the first to transmit Zen Buddhism from China to Japan and founder of the important Soto School, was not only a profoundly influential and provocative Zen philosopher but also one of the most stimulating figures in Japanese letters.

    Kazuaki Tanahashi, collaborating with several other Zen authorities, has produced sensitive and accurate translations of Dogen’s most important texts. Moon in a Dewdrop contains the key essays of the great master, as well as extensive background materials that will help Western readers to approach this significant work. There is also a selection of Dogen’s poetry, most of which has not appeared in English translation before.

    Dogen’s thought runs counter to conventional logic, employing paradoxical language and startling imagery. It illuminates such fundamental concerns as the nature of time, existence, life, death, the self, and what is beyond self.

  • Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living

    Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living (Shambhala Classics)

    by Pema Chodron

    Start Where You Are is an indispensable handbook for cultivating fearlessness and awakening a compassionate heart. With insight and humor, Pema Chödrön presents down-to-earth guidance on how we can “start where we are”—embracing rather than denying the painful aspects of our lives. Pema Chödrön frames her teachings on compassion around fifty-nine traditional Tibetan Buddhist maxims, or slogans, such as: “Always apply only a joyful state of mind,” “Don’t seek others’ pain as the limbs of your own happiness,” and “Always meditate on whatever provokes resentment.”

    Working with these slogans and through the practice of meditation, Start Where You Are shows how we can all develop the courage to work with our inner pain and discover joy, well-being, and confidence.

  • The Book of Life – Daily Meditations with Krishnamurti

    365 Daily Meditations on Freedom, Personal Transformation, Living Fully, and Much More, from the Man the Dalai Lama Described as “One of the Greatest Thinkers of the Age”

  • The Essence of Self-Realization: The Wisdom of Paramhansa Yogananda

    Yogananda was one of the most significant spiritual teachers of the 20th century. Since his classic, Autobiography of a Yogi, was first published in 1946, its popularity has increased steadily throughout the world. The Essence of Self-Realization is filled with lessons and stories that Yogananda shared only with his closest disciples, this volume offers one of the most insightful and engaging glimpses into the life and lessons of a great sage. Much of the material presented here is not available anywhere else.